The Anti-Violence Coalition In-Service Training Series provides ongoing training opportunities to decision makers and others involved in adjudicating or responding to sexual misconduct, dating/domestic violence, and stalking cases. Training opportunities are open to members of the Coalition, community partners, and others in the campus community. Contact Pam Terrill for more information.


"Forensic Experiential Trauma Interview: 2-Part Webinar Series"
Part 1: Monday, December 19, 2016, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, DPS Training Room
Part 2: Wednesday, December 21, 2016, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, DPS Training Room

Description:
When people experience trauma, they go through a process that many professionals - as well as the individuals themselves - do not understand. For example, most of us were trained to believe that when an individual experiences a traumatic event, the brain records the majority of the details investigators need, or want to know, about the event: Who, What, Where, Why, When and How?

Unfortunately, trying to collect information from a victim of a traumatic event in this way actually inhibits the accuracy of the details provided. This is because investigators typically question victims about peripheral information such as the suspect's description, i.e., height, weight, hair color, clothing worn, the time frame of the event, etc. Some victims are capable of providing this type of information in a limited fashion. However, the majority of trauma victims are not only unable to accurately provide this type of information, but when pressed to do so, they may inadvertently provide inaccurate information and details which in turn creates suspicion as well as inconsistencies.  

The Forensic Experiential Trauma Interview (FETI) is designed to change this. The technique draws on the best practices of child forensic interviews, critical incident stress management, and neuroscience - combining them into a simple three-pronged approach that unlocks the trauma experience in a way that we can better understand.

Presenter:
Russell W. Strand is an independent consultant and educator. With over 40 years' experience, he is an internationally recognized expert in the areas of domestic violence intervention, critical incident peer support, sexual assault, human trafficking, and child abuse investigations.  Mr. Strand developed the Forensic Experiential Trauma Interview (FETI), while serving as the Chief of the Behavioral Sciences Education & Training Division at the United States Army Military Police School in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.

Mr. Strand is a retired U.S. Army CID Senior Special Agent. As a result of his expertise, Mr. Stand responded to Ft. Hood, Texas to provide critical incident and trauma victim interview support following the November 2009 mass shooting. In 2012, he was inducted in the United States Army Military Police Hall of Fame.

Recording:
A recording of these webinars can be found on the End Violence Against Women International site.


"Neurobiology of Sexual Assault: 2-Part Webinar Series"
Part 1: Thursday, September 15th, 2016, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, DPS Training Room
Part 2: Monday, September 19th, 2016, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, DPS Training Room

Description:
Traumatic experiences have immediate, automatic and powerful effects on the human brain. This presentation explains how fear and trauma can alter brain functioning during sexual assault, resulting in experiences and behaviors that are, unfortunately, still commonly misunderstood by many who work with victims of sexual assault.

Participants will learn about the key brain circuitries impacted by fear and trauma, including the prefrontal cortex and the fear circuitry. Participants will come to understand brain-based responses to sexual assault, especially those associated with involuntary habits and reflexes. Participants will come to understand brain-based aspects of memory encoding, storage and retrieval that determine what can later be recalled and not recalled, including in investigative interviews and in court. This presentation provides a critical foundation for learning and applying trauma-informed responses with people who have been sexually assaulted

Presenter:
Dr. James Hopper is an independent consultant and Teaching Associate in Psychology at Harvard Medical School. For over 25 years Dr. Hopper's research, clinical and consulting work has focused on the psychological and biological effects of child abuse, sexual assault and other traumatic experiences. As a clinician Dr. Hopper works with adults who have experienced abuse as children or sexual assault as adolescents or adults. In his forensic work, both criminal and civil, he testifies on short- and long-term impacts of child abuse and sexual assault. Dr. Hopper was a founding board member and longtime advisor to 1in6 and served on the Peace Corps Sexual Assault Advisory Council. He consults and teaches nationally and internationally to military and civilian investigators, prosecutors, victim advocates, commanders and higher education administrators.

Recording:
A recording of these webinars can be found on the End Violence Against Women International site.


STOP SV: A Technical Package to Prevent Sexual Violence
Thursday, June 2, 2016, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, Lucas Dodge Room (IMU 256)

Description:
In April 2016, CDC released STOP SV: A Technical Package to Prevent Sexual Violence to help states and communities prioritize efforts to prevent sexual violence.  The strategies in this package include those with a focus on preventing sexual violence from happening in the first place, as well as approaches to lessen the immediate and long-term harms of sexual violence. Strategies are intended to work in combination and reinforce each other. The technical package describes the approaches to advance each strategy and the evidence behind them. In this web conference, we will explore how the technical package can support prevention program decision-making, identify resources to support prevention practice, and examine potential sectors to involve in sexual violence prevention.

Presenters:
James A. Mercy, Director, Division of Violence Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Kathleen Basile, Division of Violence Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Sally Laskey, National Sexual Violence Resource Center
Chad Sniffen, National Sexual Violence Resource Center


Working with the Accused Student: Your Campus' Legal and Moral Responsibilities
Monday, May 16, 2016, 10:00am - 12:00pm, Lucas Dodge Room (IMU 256)

Description:
Faced with growing concerns voiced by accused students claiming to have been falsely charged and punished for sexual misconduct, multiple campuses are currently involved in lawsuits made by accused students. Federal compliance has clearly stated what responsibility campuses have to complainants of sexual assault and violence, and the rights alleged victims have. But what legal and moral responsibilities do institutions of higher education have to accused students in cases of sexual assault? Are you confident your campus is upholding the basic due process requirements in your institutional conduct hearings? Avoid potential lawsuits and questionable practices by modeling best practices that foster a sense of confidence and legitimacy in your student disciplinary proceedings.

Presenter:
Gary Pavela serves as Editor, ASCA Law and Policy Report (Director of Student Conduct, University of Maryland, retired) & Fellow with the National Association of College and University Attorneys.


"Why Do So Many Battered Women Find Themselves in Batterer Intervention Groups?":
Coordinated Community Response to Women's Use of Violence in Intimate Partner Relationships
Thursday, March 31, 2016, 1:00pm - 2:30pm, Lucas Dodge Room (IMU 256)

Description:
Differentiating between the woman who batters and the woman who is battered and responds with the use of violence is a crucial step in the intervention process. It is not a question of proper categorization for the sake of accuracy. Getting it right is a matter of safety and is essential in reducing and escalating violence.

There is increasing agreement that intervening agencies and professionals must be able to distinguish between kinds of domestic violence, scope of domestic violence, severity of the violence, patters of the violence, function and purpose of the violence, and finally, primary perpetrator of the violence.

Presenter:
Melissa Petrangelo Scaia, MPA, Executive Director of Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs


Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault: Who Needs Force When You Have Alcohol?
Wednesday, March 9, 2016, 11:30am - 1:30pm, Penn State Room (IMU 337)

Description:
Alcohol is the most common weapon used to facilitate sexual assault. Offenders use alcohol because it renders victims vulnerable, affects memory, and impairs judgment and physical ability. Its unique toxicological effects, widespread use, and ease of consumption make it ideal for offenders who commit sexual assaults. Of course, some of the same factors that make alcohol such a perfect weapon also present unique challenges for investigators, prosecutors, and other allied professionals in alcohol-facilitated sexual assault (AFSA) cases.

This presentation, delivered in two parts, explored common issues and challenges related to the investigation and prosecution of sexual assault cases where alcohol is present. More specifically, the presenters focused on identifying corroborating evidence, interviewing victims, basic toxicology, the affect of societal attitudes about alcohol on determinations of victim credibility, and trial strategies. In addition, these recordings promote a victim-centered response that incorporates offender-focused strategies for effective investigation and prosecution of AFSA cases.

We viewed sections of this recorded webinar that were relevant to campus cases, but did not view the portions of the webinar that were specific to trial court. Our discussion focused on a critical analysis of which elements of the webinar were applicable to the university administrative procedure, and which elements were not.

Presenters:
Jane Anderson (JD) is an Attorney Advisor with AEquitas. As an Attorney Advisor, Jane presents on trial strategy, legal analysis and policy, and ethics. She provides technical assistance and case consultation for prosecutors and allied professionals; authors and develops resources, publications, and curricula; and consults on the development of protocols and policies that improve responses to crimes of violence against women.

Patricia D. Powers (JD) is an Attorney Advisor with AEquitas. As an Attorney Advisor, Patti presents on trial strategy, legal analysis and policy, and ethical issues related to violence against women. She conducts research; develops training materials, resources, and publications; and provides case consultation and technical assistance for prosecutors and allied professionals.

Recording:
Recordings of parts 1 and 2 of this webinar are available through the AEquitas homepage: http://www.aequitasresource.org/trainingDetail.cfm?id=132


Prevalence and Characteristics Among Domestic Violence and Sexual Offenders
Wednesday, January 13, 2016, 10:00am - 12:00pm, Department of Public Safety Training Room (880 UCC)

Description:
This webinar highlights the 2009 Partner Rape Study which explored the prevalence of intimate partner rape in adult sex offenders and domestic violence offenders in treatment in Colorado. Although domestic violence offenders and sex offenders are not the same, and the mechanisms that lead to these problematic behaviors differ, this webinar presents findings that these individuals exhibit similar behaviors and attitudes, particularly with respect to intimate sexual violence.

Presenter:
A. Mervyn Davies, M.A., LPC, CACIII, F.A.P.A., Davies and Associates
Dominique Simons, M.A., DAS Consulting, Inc.

Recording:
A recording of this webinar is available here: http://www.bwjp.org/resource-center/resource-results/intimate-partner-se...


Stalking and Intimate Partner Violence
Wednesday, January 6, 2016, 3:00pm - 4:30pm, Lucas Dodge Room (256 IMU)

Description:
Stalking - a dangerous and potentially lethal crime - is often misunderstood, minimized, or missed entirely. Michelle Garcia, Director of the Stalking Resource Center, will address the prevalence and dynamics of stalking, the intersection of stalking and domestic violence, and the risk of violence and lethality in stalking cases. She will also discuss the effects of stalking on victims as well as considerations for law enforcement, prosecutors, victim service providers, and other allied professionals responding to stalking crimes.

Presenter:
Michelle Garcia, Director of the National Stalking Resource Center

Recording:
A recording of this webinar is available here: http://www.familyjusticecenter.org/file-library/stalking-intimate-partne...