Title IX Investigations and Technology: Eight Emerging and Common Issues
Friday, December 11, 2015, 12:00pm - 2:00pm, 315 Phillips Hall

Description:
Presenters will explore eight emerging and common issues in how technology is changing the investigation landscape:

  1. How students, faculty and staff are communicating using technology
  2. How technology is changing the rubric - More pervasive and persistent
  3. Recent trends for using technology to assist in Title IX investigations
  4. Knowing and understanding popular dating and hook up apps
  5. Understanding anonymous online harassment or discrimination
  6. Using text messages, photos, videos and e-mails as evidence
  7. Accessing phone records, deleted social media, deleted texts
  8. Technology cheats, including fake texts, altered images, etc.

Participants will gain a stronger understanding of these eight issues as well as hands-on tips for improving and appropriately addressing Title IX investigations that involve technology.

Presenters:
Brett Sokolow, J.D., founder, president, and CEO of The NCHERM Group, LLC
Daniel Swinton, J.D., Ed.D., Managing Partner of The NCHERM Group, LLC


Consent and Blackouts: The Legal, Psychological, and Prevention Perspectives
Thursday, December 3, 2015, 12:00pm - 2:00pm, 256 IMU

Description:
Join Brett A. Sokolow, Esq. and Dr. Brian Van Brunt as they discuss the issues complicating consent when a student experiences a blackout, whether en bloc or fragmentary.  Blackout or brownouts are characterized by an inability or difficulty to recall the past as the result of alcohol or other drug use. Can a student give consent at one point and then fail to recall this later? What about students who are physically unresponsive, but have clear recall? How does a blackout’s block on memory affect capacity to consent? How should the campus resolution process handle such a case?

Through an interactive and dynamic discussion, the presenters will first review the latest literature and research, providing the definitions of blackout and brownout from the legal, student conduct and psychological/medical perspectives. They will discuss two case studies and provide an opportunity for questions and further exploration of the topic. The program will conclude with a review of ways to teach students prevention techniques related to this topic.

We will review:

  • The nature of consent
  • Legal issues related to blackout/brownout and consent
  • Psychological and medical issues related to blackout/brownout and consent
  • Discussion of two cases related to blackout and brownout drinking
  • Discussion of prevention issues related to teaching consent as it relates to blackout and brownout drinking or substance use

Presenters:
Brett Sokolow, J.D., founder, president, and CEO of The NCHERM Group, LLC
Daniel Swinton, J.D., Ed.D., Managing Partner of The NCHERM Group, LLC


Supporting the Supporters: Informal Networks Have a Role in Preventing and Ending Domestic Violence
Friday, November 13, 2015, 2:00pm - 4:00pm, 469 Van Allen Hall

Description:
This webinar explores the value of informal networks in victims’ and perpetrator’s lives. How can we support those networks to effectively respond to the needs of the victim and perpetrator; the perceived reluctance of friends and families to intervene in what is commonly understood as a private matter? How can specialist domestic violence organizations build customized education programs and supports geared towards friends and families and the general public? The presenter will challenge the domestic violence sector to move beyond the traditional service delivery model that usually only includes informal networks in the assessment phase of work with clients to a model that would include and leverage informal networks in preventing domestic violence. The presenter draws on current North American research along with learnings from a project Shift is leading in Calgary, Canada.

Presenters:
Graham Barnes, Resource Specialist, Battered Women’s Justice Project, Minneapolis MN and Elena Esina, Project Coordinator for the Brenda Strafford Chair in the Prevention of Domestic Violence at the University of Calgary, Alberta Canada.

Recording:
A recording of this webinar can be found here: http://www.bwjp.org/resource-center/resource-results/supporting-the-supporters-informal-networks.html


Strangulation Part III
Thursday, October 8th, 2015, 2:00pm - 3:30pm, Department of Public Safety Training Room (880 UCC)

Description:
This live webinar is designed for Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners (SAFE/SANEs), law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and criminalists. Topics include: clinical forensic radiology in strangulation, "consensual" strangulation, strangulation and sexual assault, clinical evaluation and management, and what prosecutors need from the medical expert in strangulation cases.

Presenter:
Dr. William Green is the Medical Director of the California Clinical Forensic Medical Training Center. He served on the faculty of the University of California, Davis, Medical School beginning in 1976 and retired as Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine in 2011. He has been Board certified in both Family Practice and Emergency Medicine. Dr. Green's work in the field of sexual assault has included participation in the creation of sexual assault forensic examination protocols for both California and the US Dept. of Justice. In 1989, Dr. Green was one of the founders of the Sexual Assault Forensic Evaluation (SAFE) Team at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center and served as the Team's Medical Director from 1989 until 2010. In the mid 1990's, Dr. Green worked with the core advisory group that helped draft the legislation that created the California Clinical Forensic Medical Training Center. He was also one of the founding faculty members of the Graduate Group in Forensic Sciences that created the Forensic Science Master's Program at UC Davis. In 2007, Dr. Green founded and co-chaired the Forensic Medicine Section in the American College of Emergency Physicians. Most recently, Dr. Green was asked to serve as advisor to the U.S. Department of Justice and the White House on sexual assault issues.

Recording:
A recording of this webinar can be found here: https://vimeo.com/cdaa/review/144026607/91980b921b


Strangulation Part II
Tuesday, September 29th, 2015, 2:00pm - 3:30pm, Department of Public Safety Training Room (880 UCC)

Description:
This live webinar is designed for Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners (SAFE/SANEs), law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and criminalists. Topics will include: strangulation pathophysiology, including causes of immediate death during strangulation, causes of delayed death after strangulation, and causes of serious medical problems and disability following strangulation; and touch DNA and strangulation.

Presenter:
Dr. William Green is the Medical Director of the California Clinical Forensic Medical Training Center. He served on the faculty of the University of California, Davis, Medical School beginning in 1976 and retired as Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine in 2011. He has been Board certified in both Family Practice and Emergency Medicine. Dr. Green's work in the field of sexual assault has included participation in the creation of sexual assault forensic examination protocols for both California and the US Dept. of Justice. In 1989, Dr. Green was one of the founders of the Sexual Assault Forensic Evaluation (SAFE) Team at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center and served as the Team's Medical Director from 1989 until 2010. In the mid 1990's, Dr. Green worked with the core advisory group that helped draft the legislation that created the California Clinical Forensic Medical Training Center. He was also one of the founding faculty members of the Graduate Group in Forensic Sciences that created the Forensic Science Master's Program at UC Davis. In 2007, Dr. Green founded and co-chaired the Forensic Medicine Section in the American College of Emergency Physicians. Most recently, Dr. Green was asked to serve as advisor to the U.S. Department of Justice and the White House on sexual assault issues.

Recording:
A recording of this webinar can be found here: https://vimeo.com/cdaa/review/143055336/11fc850c42


Strangulation Part I
Tuesday, September 8th, 2015, 2:00pm - 3:30pm, Department of Public Safety Training Room (880 UCC)

Description:
This live webinar is designed for Sexual Assault Forensic Examiners (SAFE/SANEs), law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and criminalists. The Strangulation Part II webinar will occur on September 29, 2015, from 2:00pm – 3:30pm in the DPS Training Room.

Presenter:
Dr. William Green is the Medical Director of the California Clinical Forensic Medical Training Center. He served on the faculty of the University of California, Davis, Medical School beginning in 1976 and retired as Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine in 2011. He has been Board certified in both Family Practice and Emergency Medicine. Dr. Green's work in the field of sexual assault has included participation in the creation of sexual assault forensic examination protocols for both California and the US Dept. of Justice. In 1989, Dr. Green was one of the founders of the Sexual Assault Forensic Evaluation (SAFE) Team at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center and served as the Team's Medical Director from 1989 until 2010. In the mid 1990's, Dr. Green worked with the core advisory group that helped draft the legislation that created the California Clinical Forensic Medical Training Center. He was also one of the founding faculty members of the Graduate Group in Forensic Sciences that created the Forensic Science Master's Program at UC Davis. In 2007, Dr. Green founded and co-chaired the Forensic Medicine Section in the American College of Emergency Physicians. Most recently, Dr. Green was asked to serve as advisor to the U.S. Department of Justice and the White House on sexual assault issues.

Recording:
A recording of this webinar can be found here: https://vimeo.com/cdaa/review/139731186/5914ec98ec


Developing a Framework for Engaging LGBTQ Students of Color
Tuesday, April 7th, 2015, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, Penn State Room (IMU 337)

Description
LGBTQ Survivors of Color can be one of the most vulnerable groups on any university campus. Students of Color often struggle with being invisible within the college/university community and identifying as LGBTQ might marginalize them even further.  This can create barriers to reporting violence, accessing counseling, other services or finding support among their peers. This training will provide participants with the building blocks for cultural competence, while raising awareness about the challenges and invisibility that LGBTQ Students of Color face within various communities.  This training will provide participants with the building blocks for cultural competence, while raising awareness about the challenges and invisibility that LGBTQ Students of Color face within various communities.  The training will also use an intersectional approach to creating environments where LGBTQ Students of Color feel safe to report violence and access supportive services.

Presenters:
Farah Tanis is the Executive Director of Black Women’s Blueprint, a national organization which advocates for survivors of sexual assault in Black communities, U.S., including LGBTQ and other gender non-conforming people of African descent. Her work on LGBTQ issues at Black Women’s Blueprint include the development of Ford Foundation sponsored Queer Anti-Violence Educational Theater Projects, curricula focused on an intersection of social justice issues facing women and LGBTQ communities of color, the recent co-authoring of three human rights reports as Coordinating Task Force member on Ending Racial Discrimination and Gender Justice Task Force Co-Chair of the U.S. Human Rights Network. Her work on intersectional issues facing survivors spans 1995 to the present. Tanis is a graduate of the Columbia University School of Business, Institute for Executive Nonprofit Management, a Post-Graduate Degree in Family Therapy from Hunter College, an M.A. in Social Work from Fordham University, and a B.A. In Science from NYU.  She is an OSI and a USHRI fellow.

Gabby Santos is the Director of LGBT Health Services, at In Our Own Voices.  She has worked with victims of trauma since 1994 in roles ranging from inmate support group facilitator, to policy work on behalf of LGBT POC.  Racial justice work, transgender activism and criminal justice reform are at the heart of her passion. Gabby is committed to promoting the sexual health of LGBT POC and their communities in order to end health disparities. She provides leadership to various projects, including Unity Through Diversity, a National LGBT POC Health Summit, and the Annual Black & Latino Gay Pride of the Capital District of NY. She is also a member of the Arte Sana board of directors and ALAS, the national Latina alliance against sexual violence.

Mira Yusef is the co-founder and current Executive Director of Monsoon United Asian Women of Iowa. She was a December 2007 recipient of a Masters in Social Work with specialization on Community Organizing and a Masters in Southeast Asian Studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.


Due Process in Student Conduct Proceedings: Process & Procedures
Wednesday, March 4, 2015, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, Penn State Room (IMU 337)

Description:
A recent discussion has ensued within higher education regarding the definition of due process in student conduct hearings, especially in light of multiple recent lawsuits being brought forth by accused students. While judges are reluctant to impose traditional trial-type procedures in college disciplinary proceedings, they also recognize — in the words of one federal court — that the serious sanctions students may face can have "a major immediate and life-long impact" on their  "personal life, education, [and] employment." This webinar is designed to help you find the right balance between speed, efficiency and informality in disciplinary proceedings and the imperative to provide adequate due process that commensurate with the penalties imposed. Our expert presenters, Dr. Gary Pavela and Dr. Gregory Pavela, will also examine the broader function of due process procedures in fostering a sense of legitimacy in institutional rules and governance.

Presenters:
Gary Pavela serves as Editor, ASCA Law and Policy Report (Director of Student Conduct, University of Maryland, retired) & Fellow with the National Association of College and University Attorneys.

Gregory Pavela currently serves as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Public Health at UAB at the  University of Alabama at Birmingham. 


Voluntary Intoxication: It's Not Consent for Sex, You Know!
Wednesday, February 11, 2015, 1:30pm - 3:30pm, Penn State Room (IMU 337)

Description:
This webinar recording discusses sexual assault investigations and prosecutions involving voluntarily intoxicated victims present significant challenges. Many predators know of these challenges and prey upon voluntarily intoxicated victims. All too often, investigators and prosecutors focus on explaining away the victim’s choices and behaviors rather than focusing on the predator’s use of intoxication as a tool. Consequently, these cases are often not properly investigated, charged, or are lost at trial. This lecture will provide participants with a strong foundation in the toxicology of alcohol and how to investigate to identify the outward manifestations of the impact of alcohol, as well as its impact on decision-making, memory and perception. The presentation offers strategies for re-framing the investigation and prosecution to ensure that they are conducted in an offender focused way.

Presenter:
Russell Strand, the Chief of the US Army Military Police School Behavioral Sciences Education & Training Division


The Stalking and Harassment Assessment and Risk Profile
Thursday, January 15, 2015, 1:30pm - 3:30pm, Lucas Dodge Room (IMU 256)

Description
This presentation will introduce the Stalking and Harassment Assessment and Risk Profile (SHARP) and will describe the assumptions and conceptual framework. The overall goal of SHARP is to provide a research informed tool for increasing awareness of stalking by: (1) Assessing the "big picture" of stalking; (2) describing the risk profile to better understand the level of concern and dangerousness of the situation; (3) providing users with a narrative summary of responses to the assessment questions in a word document that can be used for a variety of purposes; and, (4) suggesting research-grounded safety strategies based on assessment responses for consideration. SHARP is a tool that can be used in conjunction with other risk assessments and tools in the field. SHARP can be used by victims or others on behalf of the victim.

Presenters
TK Logan, Professor, Department of Behavioral Science, College of Medicine, and the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research at the University of Kentucky and Teri Faragher, Executive Director of the Domestic Violence Prevention Board, Lexington, KY.

Recording:
A link to the recording of this webinar can be found on the Battered Women's Justice Project website: http://www.bwjp.org/general_dv_webinar_recordings.aspx