Developing a Framework for Engaging LGBTQ Students of Color
Tuesday, April 7th, 2015, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, Penn State Room (IMU 337)

Description
LGBTQ Survivors of Color can be one of the most vulnerable groups on any university campus. Students of Color often struggle with being invisible within the college/university community and identifying as LGBTQ might marginalize them even further.  This can create barriers to reporting violence, accessing counseling, other services or finding support among their peers. This training will provide participants with the building blocks for cultural competence, while raising awareness about the challenges and invisibility that LGBTQ Students of Color face within various communities.  This training will provide participants with the building blocks for cultural competence, while raising awareness about the challenges and invisibility that LGBTQ Students of Color face within various communities.  The training will also use an intersectional approach to creating environments where LGBTQ Students of Color feel safe to report violence and access supportive services.

Presenters:
Farah Tanis is the Executive Director of Black Women’s Blueprint, a national organization which advocates for survivors of sexual assault in Black communities, U.S., including LGBTQ and other gender non-conforming people of African descent. Her work on LGBTQ issues at Black Women’s Blueprint include the development of Ford Foundation sponsored Queer Anti-Violence Educational Theater Projects, curricula focused on an intersection of social justice issues facing women and LGBTQ communities of color, the recent co-authoring of three human rights reports as Coordinating Task Force member on Ending Racial Discrimination and Gender Justice Task Force Co-Chair of the U.S. Human Rights Network. Her work on intersectional issues facing survivors spans 1995 to the present. Tanis is a graduate of the Columbia University School of Business, Institute for Executive Nonprofit Management, a Post-Graduate Degree in Family Therapy from Hunter College, an M.A. in Social Work from Fordham University, and a B.A. In Science from NYU.  She is an OSI and a USHRI fellow.

Gabby Santos is the Director of LGBT Health Services, at In Our Own Voices.  She has worked with victims of trauma since 1994 in roles ranging from inmate support group facilitator, to policy work on behalf of LGBT POC.  Racial justice work, transgender activism and criminal justice reform are at the heart of her passion. Gabby is committed to promoting the sexual health of LGBT POC and their communities in order to end health disparities. She provides leadership to various projects, including Unity Through Diversity, a National LGBT POC Health Summit, and the Annual Black & Latino Gay Pride of the Capital District of NY. She is also a member of the Arte Sana board of directors and ALAS, the national Latina alliance against sexual violence.

Mira Yusef is the co-founder and current Executive Director of Monsoon United Asian Women of Iowa. She was a December 2007 recipient of a Masters in Social Work with specialization on Community Organizing and a Masters in Southeast Asian Studies from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.


Due Process in Student Conduct Proceedings: Process & Procedures
Wednesday, March 4, 2015, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, Penn State Room (IMU 337)

Description:
A recent discussion has ensued within higher education regarding the definition of due process in student conduct hearings, especially in light of multiple recent lawsuits being brought forth by accused students. 

While judges are reluctant to impose traditional trial-type procedures in college disciplinary proceedings, they also recognize — in the words of one federal court — that the serious sanctions students may face can have "a major immediate and life-long impact" on their  "personal life, education, [and] employment."

This webinar is designed to help you find the right balance between speed, efficiency and informality in disciplinary proceedings and the imperative to provide adequate due process that commensurate with the penalties imposed. 

Our expert presenters, Dr. Gary Pavela and Dr. Gregory Pavela, will also examine the broader function of due process procedures in fostering a sense of legitimacy in institutional rules and governance.

Presenters:
Gary Pavela serves as Editor, ASCA Law and Policy Report (Director of Student Conduct, University of Maryland, retired) & Fellow with the National Association of College and University Attorneys.

Gregory Pavela currently serves as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Public Health at UAB at the  University of Alabama at Birmingham. 

Recording:
To find out more about viewing the recording and slides from this webinar, please email Liz Willmore at OSMRC


Voluntary Intoxication: It's Not Consent for Sex, You Know!
Wednesday, February 11, 2015, 1:30pm - 3:30pm, Penn State Room (IMU 337)

Description:
This webinar recording discusses sexual assault investigations and prosecutions involving voluntarily intoxicated victims present significant challenges. Many predators know of these challenges and prey upon voluntarily intoxicated victims. All too often, investigators and prosecutors focus on explaining away the victim’s choices and behaviors rather than focusing on the predator’s use of intoxication as a tool. Consequently, these cases are often not properly investigated, charged, or are lost at trial. This lecture will provide participants with a strong foundation in the toxicology of alcohol and how to investigate to identify the outward manifestations of the impact of alcohol, as well as its impact on decision-making, memory and perception. The presentation offers strategies for re-framing the investigation and prosecution to ensure that they are conducted in an offender focused way.

Presenter:
Russell Strand, the Chief of the US Army Military Police School Behavioral Sciences Education & Training Division

Recording:
To find out more about viewing the recording and slides from this webinar, please email Liz Willmore at OSMRC


The Stalking and Harassment Assessment and Risk Profile
Thursday, January 15, 2015, 1:30pm - 3:30pm, Lucas Dodge Room (IMU 256)

Description
This presentation will introduce the Stalking and Harassment Assessment and Risk Profile (SHARP) and will describe the assumptions and conceptual framework. The overall goal of SHARP is to provide a research informed tool for increasing awareness of stalking by: (1) Assessing the "big picture" of stalking; (2) describing the risk profile to better understand the level of concern and dangerousness of the situation; (3) providing users with a narrative summary of responses to the assessment questions in a word document that can be used for a variety of purposes; and, (4) suggesting research-grounded safety strategies based on assessment responses for consideration. SHARP is a tool that can be used in conjunction with other risk assessments and tools in the field. SHARP can be used by victims or others on behalf of the victim.

Presenters
TK Logan, Professor, Department of Behavioral Science, College of Medicine, and the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research at the University of Kentucky and Teri Faragher, Executive Director of the Domestic Violence Prevention Board, Lexington, KY.

Recording:
A link to the recording of this webinar can be found on the Battered Women's Justice Project website: http://www.bwjp.org/general_dv_webinar_recordings.aspx


Researcher/Practitioner Discourse: Strangulation and Domestic Violence
Friday, December 12, 2014, 2:00pm - 3:30pm

Description
Faculty will discuss the findings of medical research from Louisville, KY on strangulation in the context of domestic violence. Faculty will consider “best practices” in DV strangulation cases for law enforcement, expert witnesses, prosecutors and judges.

Presenters
William Spafford Smock, MD, MS, FACEP, FAAEM is Police Surgeon of the Louisville Metropolitan Police Department, an Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, the Research Assistant Professor of Military/Emergency Medicine, and the Medical Director of the Sexual Assault Nursing Program, Kelsey McKay, JD is a prosecutor in Travis County, Texas for ten years. Over the last four years she has exclusively prosecuted strangulation related crimes, and The Honorable Michael Denton has served as a Judge in Austin, Texas since 1999.

Recording:
A link to the recording of this webinar can be found on the Battered Women's Justice Project website: http://www.bwjp.org/general_dv_webinar_recordings.aspx


A Paradigm Shift: The Forensic Experiential Trauma Interview (FETI)
Wednesday, December 10, 2014, 11:30am - 1:00pm, Department of Public Safety

Description:
A torn shirt, bruises or even a DNA profile developed from a sexual assault forensic evidence kit do not -- by themselves -- necessarily prove that a sexual assault or other traumatic event occurred.  They don’t even necessarily clarify the issue of consent or incapacitation, as many people assume.  However, they do tend to assist us in understanding the reality of the crime. They are traditional forms of evidence that prosecutors and defense attorneys will typically include when arguing their cases.

But what about the nightmares, posttraumatic stress, depression, muscular pain and fear? 

Although these examples of forensic psycho-physiological evidence also don’t prove the sexual assault on their own, they can provide evidentiary value – if they are carefully documented and properly explained -- by helping others to understand victimization and the impact of trauma on the way in which memories are recorded.

Unfortunately, many criminal investigations reach a dead end because they are often seen as having “insufficient evidence.”  Yet one of the most critical sources of evidence -- the victim’s statement -- is all too often overlooked or minimized in terms of the potential information and corroboration it can provide.

Physical evidence is not always available but psycho-physiological evidence almost always is, if we know what to look for and how to document it. This presentation explores ways in which psycho-physiological evidence can be identified, preserved, analyzed and presented at trial to take our cases from a one-dimensional aspect to a three-dimensional understanding of the full experience and impact of the crime and the trauma it causes. 

This webinar reviews current forensic psycho-physiological knowledge and practices, comparing what we think we know with new and exciting research and ideas for what we could do. Using the forensic experiential trauma interview approach, we can gather the best possible evidence by interviewing victims in ways that empower and calm them, so they are able to provide more accurate, coherent, consistent and persuasive narratives.

Presenter
Russell W. Strand is currently the Chief of the U.S. Army Military Police School, Behavioral Sciences Education and Training Division. Mr. Strand is a retired U.S. Army CID Federal Special Agent with an excess of 36 year's law enforcement and investigative, and consultation experience. Mr. Strand has specialized expertise, experience and training in the area of domestic violence intervention, critical incident peer support, and sexual assault, trafficking in persons and child abuse investigations.

He has established, developed, produced, and conducted the U.S. Army Sexual Assault Investigations, Domestic Violence Intervention Training, Sexual Assault Investigations and Child Abuse Prevention and Investigation Techniques courses and supervised the development of the Critical Incident Peer Support course. Mr. Strand has also assisted in the development and implementation of Department of Defense (DOD) training standards, programs of instruction, and lesson plans for Sexual Assault Response Coordinators (SARC), victim advocates, chaplains, criminal investigators, first responders, commanders, and health professionals. He is a member of the Defense Family Advocacy Command Assistance Team and Department of the Army Fatality Review Board. He is also recognized as a U.S. Army and Department of Defense subject matter expert and consultant in the area of spouse and child abuse, critical incident peer support and sexual violence. He routinely conducts training for national and international organizations including Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape, California Coalition Against Sexual Assault, End Violence Against Woman International, Department of Justice, Calgary Sex Crimes Services, and Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. Mr. Strand developed the DOD Trafficking in Persons Law Enforcement First Responders and Investigators training modules. Mr. Strand continues to conduct interviews of child and adult victims of physical and sexual abuse and provides investigative and consultation support as requested in ongoing sexual assault, domestic violence, and child abuse investigations, interventions, and military and civilian criminal trials.

Recording:
A link to the recording of this webinar can be found on the End Violence Against Women International's website: http://www.evawintl.org/WebinarArchive.aspx


Domestic Violence Response for Students with an Offending Partner who is NOT a Student
Tuesday, October 7, 2014, 1:00pm - 3:00pm, Nebraska Room (IMU 335)

Description
A spotlight has been placed on sexual violence on college campuses, however it is critical we do not lose focus on the impact of relationship violence on students. In particular, when their partner may not be a student on campus or part of their college community.  This webinar during Domestic Violence Awareness Month will discuss the unique dynamics that play out in response policies and procedures when addressing this type of relationship violence.

Recording:
To find out more about viewing the recording and slides from this webinar, please email Liz Willmore at OSMRC


The Neurobiology of Sexual Assault
Wednesday, October 1, 2014, 12:00pm - 2:00pm, Department of Public Safety

Description
This course is designed for law enforcement personnel in the criminal justice and community response to sexual assault.  Participants will learn about the neurobiology of trauma and its application to victims of sexual assault.  By exploring how trauma affects victims’ emotions and behavior, special attention will be given to examining how the brain processes and recalls traumatic events.  This will help law enforcement personnel and others recognize how these concepts can be applied to sexual assault investigations – with the goal of improving both victim well-being and case success.

Presenter
Dr. Rebecca Campbell is a Professor of Psychology at Michigan State University. She holds a Ph.D. in community psychology with a concentration in statistics, also from Michigan State University For the past 25 years, she has been conducting community-based, participatory research on violence against women and children, with an emphasis on sexual assault. Dr. Campbell’s research examines how contact with the legal and medical systems affects adult, adolescent, and pediatric victims’ psychological and physical health. Over her career, she has received external research funding from the National Institute of Justice, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She has received numerous research and teaching awards, including the 2008 Early Career Award from the American Psychological Association for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest.

Recording:
A link to the recording of this webinar can be found on the End Violence Against Women International's website: http://www.evawintl.org/WebinarArchive.aspx


Information about training offered in the 2015-2016 can be found here.

Information about training being offered in the current academic year can be found here.