The data in this section reflect reports that were received by OSMRC between January 1, 2017, and December 31, 2017. The data do not reflect Clery crime statistics, which can be found in the Annual Security Report published by the Department of Public Safety. While many of these reports refer to incidents that happened in the context of a person’s affiliation to the University of Iowa, OSMRC also receives reports about incidents that happened off campus or before a person came to the university. These reports are also included in the data shared in this section. 

 

Reports received by OSMRC in 2017: Breakdown by month

Graph of reports received in 2017 by month

Reports may contain more than one incident and/or incident type, or more than one reporting party.
 

Month Reports received
January 28
February 33
March 30
April 31
May 44
June 14
July 19
August 46
September 58
October 66
November 56
December 34

 

This breakdown of reports received by month reflects changes throughout the calendar year. The increase in reports received in September, October, and November is consistent with national statistics reflecting increased risk of victimization at the beginning of the academic year, especially for first-year students. Our current prevention programming includes the required completion of an online education program before students arrive on campus and bystander intervention during On Iowa!.

The decrease in reports over the summer months and in December is reflective of the smaller student and employee population on campus during university breaks. We often experience an increased number of reports in May related to student accommodation requests at the end of the academic year. An ongoing priority is to increase messaging about accommodations so all students and employees know they can ask for help without making a report. 

 

Reports received by OSMRC in 2017: Comparison with previous years

The data in this section reflect reports that were received by OSMRC in each calendar year (January 1 to December 31) in 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2017. The data do not reflect Clery crime statistics, which can be found in the Annual Security Report published by the Department of Public Safety. While many of these reports refer to incidents that happened in the context of a person’s affiliation to the University of Iowa, OSMRC also receives reports about incidents that happened off campus or before a person came to the university. These reports are also included in the data shared in this section.

Reports are classified based on the best information we have available; reports we receive vary greatly in the level of detail they contain. A single report may include multiple incidents and/or multiple incident types. Reports including multiple incident types appear under each incident type category. 

Graph showing 4-year comparison of reports received

Reports may contain more than one incident and/or incident type, or more than one reporting party. 
 

Incident type 2014 2015 2016 2017
Sexual assault 83 100 123 145
Sexual harassment 114 128 124 153
Dating/domestic violence 57 73 107 101
Stalking 35 43 94 72
Sexual exploitation/intimidation 17 32 22 29

 

The number of reports we receive continues to increase. However, an increase in the number of reports received by our office doesn’t necessarily mean more incidents are occurring. Indeed, national data consistently suggests these incidents are vastly under-reported. The increase in reports received could instead reflect increased awareness of campus resources and reporting options, increased awareness of what constitutes a reportable offense, or the national conversation brought on by the #MeToo movement. The Anti-Violence Coalition continues to engage in ongoing collaborative efforts to raise awareness about all incident types. 

 

Reports received by OSMRC in 2017: Affiliation of the reporting party

We use the term “reporting party” to describe the individual harmed in an incident reported to the university. Any person harmed, including those with no UI affiliation, has the option to make an administrative complaint against a UI student or employee.

OSMRC facilitates accommodations for any university student or employee impacted by sexual misconduct, dating/domestic violence, or stalking, whether or not that individual chooses to make a complaint. In cases in which the reporting party has no university affiliation, OSMRC may reach out to provide information about confidential support resources.

The “affiliation unknown to the UI” category includes reports in which the party’s affiliation was known but not disclosed to the UI. These data reflect reports in which the respondent was student, staff, faculty, unaffiliated, or of unknown affiliation. 

Graph showing the affiliation of the reporting party by incident type

Reports may contain more than one incident and/or incident type, or more than one reporting party. 
 

Incident type Student Staff Faculty Unaffiliated Affiliation unknown to UI
Sexual assault 125 7 1 7 6
Sexual harassment 91 51 11 4 1
Dating/domestic violence 69 15 3 14 2
Stalking 56 9 5 5 0
Sexual exploitation/intimidation 21 6 0 3 1

 

National statistics indicate that college-aged students are at higher risk of victimization than other age groups. Our prevention programming for students continues to focus on shifting cultural norms and encouraging bystander intervention.

Increased reporting amongst students may also be related to students’ greater number of interactions with A/AOs. We are grateful to partners who have committed to training employees about their reporting responsibilities, ensuring those harmed have access to resources. The Speak Out Iowa survey results indicate that students are most likely to disclose to a peer; there is an identified need to provide training to more students about how to respond to disclosure and how to connect a friend with resources.

We have also identified a need to learn more about employee experiences with sexual misconduct by collaborating with the Chief Diversity Office and the Office of the Provost to conduct a climate survey for employees. We want to ensure employees feel comfortable seeking help. 

 

Reports received by OSMRC in 2017: Affiliation of the respondent

We use the term “respondent” to describe the individual reported to have committed harm. The affiliation of the respondent determines whether the university has jurisdiction to investigate, which policies apply, and which offices might be involved in responding.

Student conduct investigations are conducted by the Office of the Dean of Students. Employee conduct investigation are conducted by the Office of Equal Opportunity and Diversity. If a respondent is not affiliated with the university, our ability to take action is limited.

The “affiliation unknown to the UI” category includes reports in which the party’s affiliation was known but not disclosed to the UI. These data reflect reports in which the reporting party was student, staff, faculty, unaffiliated, or of unknown affiliation. 

Graph showing the affiliation of the respondent by incident type

Reports may contain more than one incident and/or incident type, or more than one reporting party. 
 

Incident type Student Staff Faculty Unaffiliated Affiliation unknown to UI
Sexual assault 54 5 3 34 49
Sexual harassment 45 57 16 10 25
Dating/domestic violence 38 3 1 37 22
Stalking 36 3 0 21 12
Sexual exploitation/intimidation 9 2 1 3 14

 

Prevention programming for students continues to focus on shifting cultural norms and encouraging bystander intervention.

The high number of reports of sexual harassment involving staff relative to other incident types likely reflects an increased awareness of sexual harassment as a workplace policy. University of Iowa employees with a greater than 50% appointment are required to complete a prevention education program when they begin employment and must repeat the training every three years.

Some of the reports involving unaffiliated respondents are Clery reports and relate to incidents that occurred on campus properties, including incidents in which neither party is affiliated.

The reports in which the respondent’s affiliation was unknown includes cases in which someone was harmed by someone they didn’t know, and also includes cases in which the respondent’s identity was known but not shared. 

 

Reports received by OSMRC in 2017: Incident location

Tracking the locations of reported incidents allows OSMRC to identify and address possible patterns. The location of incidents is also important for data collection related to the Clery Act, which requires that campuses report information about crimes committed on campus or areas adjacent to campus.

For the purposes of this report, “on campus” refers to reports in which at least one incident took place in a campus building, including academic buildings, residence halls, and the hospital; in campus parking lots and public areas; in fraternity and sorority houses; and in buildings controlled by our university, such as dorms in a university-sponsored study abroad program. “Off campus” refers to reports in which at least one incident took place at a reported off campus location. “Unknown” refers to reports in which no location information was shared. 

Graph showing the location of reports by incident type

Reports may contain more than one incident and/or incident type, or more than one reporting party. 
 

Incident type On campus Off campus Unknown
Sexual assault 50 57 38
Sexual harassment 131 13 9
Dating/domestic violence 47 34 20
Stalking 61 9 2
Sexual exploitation/intimidation 23 6 0

 

Most reports received by OSMRC related to incidents that occurred on campus, indicating an opportunity to continue our prevention efforts by working with departments and colleges to create protective environments on campus. There also continues to be a clear need to collaborate with off-campus partners in the community through programs like Raise the Bar.